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Hi! I'm Bart Bonte, a Belgian independent game designer and bontegames.com is where I blog about fun new interesting browser games. My own games are all in the left column. More info about me and my games on bartbonte.com.
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April 09, 2015

abandoned: the cube chambers

More pointing and clicking in mysterious chambers in a new point and click game by Krutovig: abandoned: the cube chambers.

20 comments:

-k said...

Hmmm, this seems to be a trial and error (mostly error) with little-to-no clues-type puzzle. I could be missing some very obvious items, but beyond the first two sections, I find myself both frustrated and bored. I'm sure this one will have its fan base, but I can;t count myself among it. Thanks anyway, Bart. I certainly don't expect to like everything you share. ;)

Anonymous said...

Just watched first half of walkthrough... I am none the wiser...

Tom said...

Out. Some of the levels were very easy, but some were a bit obscure. Figuring out the goal of each level was a significant part of the challenge. I found the first 3 pretty obvious. The 4th was easy once I figured out the goal. The 5th was a bit obscure and strange, but easy once you figure out the goal. The 6th (the pyramid) seemed a little less constrained than I'd like, but I eventually got it. The last two were easy.

Anonymous said...

Isnt that Submachine?

DQ said...

Nope, I don't get it. The first three levels were doable but nr 4 is a mystery, even after watching the walk through.

Tom said...

The fourth level is just a "15 puzzle", only instead of 4x4 it's 3x3. So there are 8 numbered pieces and a "hole", and you need to put them in order by clicking on a block adjacent to the hole, in the direction of the hole, which causes that block to slide to the hole and relocates you to that position. So you do have to know how to place the symbols for the numbers in order (based on the numbers in the second puzzle, but slightly modified for some reason). That was the one thing that annoyed me about the puzzle. Anyway, here's info on the classic "15 puzzle": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15_puzzle

Anonymous said...

When I have to look at the walkthrough on the first level & it doesn't make sense, I loose interest quickly. This one's not for me.

Stevens Miller said...

The "numbers" on the walls in the fourth level aren't self-explanatory, and there is no way to get back to the second level and review them.

A dud.

Tom said...

Yes, I agree about the numbers on the 4th level. I actually started over just so I could see what they were on the second level. And furthermore, they were actually different - they were inverted, and the dots had moved. But they were close enough that it wasn't a problem. The main issue was having to go back to see the sequence, which I agree is inexcusable. It's also hard to understand why this wasn't obvious to the designer - seems like it could have been fixed very easily.

Nat R. said...

The number things didn't seem so hard to me- kind of intuitive. A line is 1, two lines is 2, two lines with a dot is 3, a curve is 4, etc. (Don't know if this counts as giving things away... sorry.)

Nat R. said...

Aha- just got level 5. Yes- Tom's assessment about sums it up. And beware of false leads and pointless elements.

Nat R. said...

P.S. The numbers on the tile with 1 dot on it are Fibonacci numbers!

PyroLuna said...

I am having trouble with the chess piece one, I get how you have to move to turn on the lights but I keep getting blocked in with no where left to go.

Anonymous said...

a sliding puzzle while your inside the rooms....i quit

Stage name said...

A clever, well-implemented puzzle game. I particularly liked the way you had to experiment to find out what was going on. That said, there were some rough edges. And the ending was a bit of a letdown. Still, I'll be looking out for the next installment.

Anonymous said...

I agree that a portion of the puzzles were hard to figure out without the walkthrough or some serious trial-and-error. Even after getting the answer from the walkthrough, I still don't get HOW the pyramid puzzle works.

Other than that, I found the game somewhat intriguing. The second puzzle reminds me of Submachine 3: The Loop (Submachine and Abandoned have very similar styles). There were also other interesting details, such as the Fibonacci-numbered tomes.

The ending is suspenseful and enlightening at the same time. While this isn't the best of games, I'm still excited for Abandoned 2.

Anonymous said...

Fibonacci numbers:
0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 ...
I don't see what your trying to say.

Ann Quark said...

The pyramid level is quite simple : the first row is only powers of the number 2. In order to obtain a number above, you just need to add the three numbers immediately below. Et voilĂ !

Anonymous said...

A while back I played another game that was eerily like the Submachine series and it took me a second to realize that game and this one are from the same creator. I really wish he could find his own style. Based on his Facebook page, he seems to be trying to branch out, but this is a Submachine ripoff, from the "storyline" and locales, down to the piles of sand and the "secrets." Aside from that, it's not even fun or engaging like Submachine is.

Nat R. said...

@Anon 15:11- The weird script on the 4 tiles (yes, all 4) is Fibonacci numbers in Krutovig's weird numeric system (based in history? I don't know). I don't think that's relevant to the puzzle (I solved it without using that), but I think he put them there on purpose. The only reason I pointed it out is because I thought it was cool, and it appeared that I was the only one to notice it.

 

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